Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Interview with Justin Lee, Asian American Film Lab's New Shootout Coordinator


Today's interview is with Justin Lee. Justin is Asian American Film Lab's new Shootout Coordinator. Justin joins AA Film Lab at an exciting time. AA Film Lab just had the Asians on Film Festival in Los Angeles, which is the first event that it's had in LA. Justin Samuels: What has interested you in working with AA Film Lab?

Justin Lee: I wanted to be around independent filmmakers. I wanted to be around more people like myself, people who are all making sacrifices to be around what they love. That was my initial interest. However, after talking to lovely Jennifer (board member); she made me realize the wider spectrum of the 72-hour shootout. For example, I get to come up with the theme! JS: Have you yourself dealt with the lack of diversity in the media?

JL:Yes. I work at a advertising production company- and the lack of diversity in the whole industry is astounding. Not that it’s on purpose or inherent- it just is. I think it’s backlash from not having more diversity when filmmaking was just coming out, but I’m sure a film historian could tell you more about that.

The lack of diversity isn’t just racial, it’s everything. Their promoting a certain shape: chiseled chin, dark brows, tall, skinny, ripped, big breasts...etc. If you don’t meet the criteria (I certainly don’t), people tend to pay more attention those who do. It makes who you are as an individual, what makes you interesting & good- irrelevant.

I think due to the lack of diversity, people lump minority groups together and stereotype them according to what they see. I deal with the lack of diversity in the media every time someone calls me Jeremy Lin, Jackie Chan, Jet Li, Bruce Lee...etc. I want to be defined by me, not by some middle age white guy sitting in some Hollywood exec office saying “This Kung-fu movie is going to be great!”

JS: How do you think the film, tv, and commercial/advertising media can be diversified?

JL: I was attending a panel where Spike Lee mentioned how films got green-lit. He brought up the film Soul Plane, a movie considered hurtful to Black America. It’s a film that basically reinforces black stereotypes.

I remember Spike Lee reeling about how there was probably no black person in that conference room when they decided to make the film. No one in that position of power who can say “Hold on a second, this movie is about what?!”.

We need more diversity among positions of power and influence. We need someone in that conference room saying “You know what? That’s pretty racist. No.”

JS: What can you tell us about the 2014 72 Hour Shootout? Where are the films screened or shown?

JL: The screenings are usually run through Asian American International, and a theatre will be provided to the shootout as time gets closer.

I can tell you that I’m super excited for it! I’m a big advocate for individuality and visual expression. I can tell you that we’ll probably see some form of those two as the 10th annual theme for the shootout.

JS: What does the Shootout Coordinator do?

JL: I think the most exciting thing about being the shootout coordinator is how much of our personality/work can be put into each shootout. We get to come up with a theme, a promotional video, do interviews, and basically represent each years shootout.

Usually when I coordinate it’s to support the producer. A lot of bookings, budgets, and a logistics (Which I will also be doing for the shootout). It’s kind of refreshing to be able to put some of my personality into this job.

JS: Have you ever worked with a non profit film organization before?

JL: Yes! I volunteered for the Asian American Film Festival back in 2011- but I think that’s it.

JS: Do you have any additional work planned with AA Film Lab?

JL:I really hope so, but you should get back to me at the end of the shootout!

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Columbia Stages Presents the Physicists, Starring Jon Peacock


As Advertised by Columbia Stages.

Columbia Stages is proud to present THE PHYSICISTS, an MFA Directing thesis production, written by Friedrich Dürrenmatt, translated by James Kirkup, directed by Sina Heiss. THE PHYSICISTS will open at The Connelly and run from January 22-25, 2014.

This Swiss play was written in the early 1960s, during the Cold War, under the looming danger of a devastating nuclear attack. Durrenmatt brings his characters to life in a home for the mentally ill and with a good sense of black humor, investigates how people behave within social confinements and their power politics.

In the well-funded asylum Les Cerisiers, nurses have recently been meeting violent deaths. The assailants are two lunatics who believe themselves to be Newton and Einstein and their fellow inmate, Johann Wilhelm Möbius, knows more than he is willing to share . . .

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THE PHYSICISTS by Friedrich Durrenmatt Translated by James Kirkup

JANUARY 22-25, 2014 THE CONNELLY THEATRE

Address: 220 East 4th Street, NYC

Showtimes: January 22-25 at 8pm January 25 at 2pm

Tickets: $15/$5 Seniors/FREE with Student ID.

To Donate for FREE TICKETS: (Please Share!):

***

Director: Sina Heiss Producer: Mia Shen Dramaturg: Ashley Minihan Choreography: Lia Bonfilio Scenic Design: Evelien Stichelmeyer Lighting Design: Daisy Long Costume Design: Brooke Cohen Sound Design: Manuel Mitterhuber Sound Engineer: Grant Jefferson Vocal Arranger: Regina Mallinger Production Stage Manager: Jenny Ainsworth Assistant Stage Managers: Kate Dial, Alayna Graziani Company Manager: Polina Bogacheva

Featuring: Lia Bonfilio, Ben Compton, Dianne Diep, Matthew Dunivan, Tim Elliott, Chris Holland, Cameron Jefts, Miranda Kahn, Toby Knops, Brian Keith MacDonald*, Jon L Peacock, Alexander Reed, Aubrey Lace Taylor, Vanessa Winkle.

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

At the Golden Globes Adrian Bustamante Interviews Nathalie DuBois of DPA Gifting Suite


Today I have a guest interviewer, actor Adrian Bustamante. We decided to cover the Golden Globes and interview one of the gifting suite companies that provides gifts to celebrities at major events such as Golden Globes and Cannes. The company interviewed was DPA Gifting Suite , owned by Nathalie Dubois. Some of the major companies that were at her suite were Coco Libre, Herzog Wine Cellars, the Yes Bar, Toffee Talk, Jill's Chocolates, the Sierra Club, Hinerava, Arido, Salvatore Ferragamo, Michael Kors,and Doina Pirau. The companies ranged from food/snack and beverage companies to fine jewelry, sunglasses, and other apparel companies. Adrian Bustamante: What's the name of the gifting suite?

Nathalie DuBois: DPA Gift Suite.

AB: How long have you been doing the gifting suite?

ND: This is the 9th year.

AB: Is there anything you would say to set your gifting suite apart from others at the Golden Globes?

ND: Two different things. There are many gifting suites in this city. The main thing is we're French and the French are very picky. We're the only one that have an international business. We did Dubai Film Festival for 5 years. We worked in the Middle East. We also worked in Asia in the Hong Kong Film Festival. We did pre Oscar, and we've done Cannes since 2005. Aside from our international events, we do international brands. The quality of our products is much better than some of the other gifting suites. Everything we have is really good quality. We have products that range from snacks and beverages to apparel. The clients are welcome to go somewhere else, but they will see the difference. We have the most A list celebrities.

A:B Yeah, exactly. I've noticed that as opposed to other suites, you guys actually have tour guides. What made you want to go that way instead of the normal route where they walk through and just say hi?

ND: Simply because I want them to have an experience. We have to carry their bags. We introduce them to people so they feel comfortable. We don't want to bombard people with different colors. We have to be a bit more sophisticated. I once took my clients to a suite that looked like a really bad trade show. I thought I could do much better. Also being French, I thought we could bring sophistication to it. I don't like to use the swag words. My thing is not swag. Just really beautiful products.

AB: I notice the products DPA has are actually products that I can use or that I can consume. Sometimes gifting suites have a lot of useless things.

ND: Everything we have, I use myself or I believe in it. It's my integrity. I am not money driven. I will not take a product I don't believe in even if someone offers me a fortune. I am not able to sell anything I don't believe in. Everything I have in the suite I either have, use, or wear. An example of what I'm proud of is that Sharon Stone will come to my suite wearing a necklace I gave her two years ago. Or in September Felicity was wearing a clutch I gave her three years ago in the Monte Carlo Film Festival. She said it was her power clutch that she uses when she goes to important meetings. They don't give my products to their maids, family, or friends. They don't recycle my gifts. They wear them.

AB: Yeah, makes sense. How do you choose what companies are at your gifting suite?

ND: There's different ways. We do a lot of research. I buy about $300 worth of press a week. I go to trade shows. I have meetings with foreign consulate with their development, like L'Oreal. I go to fashion week in Paris and Mumbai. I go to luxury trade shows in Monte Carlo and Paris. I just search. Before that I produced fashioned shows, and before that I was a journalist. Producing fashion shows gave me an edge. A lot of people approach me, they want to be a part of me. To give you an example someone called me at 7:30 this morning after she saw a segment on Fox. She wanted to put 25 pairs of shoes in my suite. I told her no; it was at the last minute. It is through referrals that companies get into my suite. Clients and stars both refer companies to me. The handbags were referred to me by a star in Paris. We have fantastic reputations with both the clients and the celebrities because of our excellent service and that makes our image.

AB: Yeah, it definitely does. I noticed from talking to people that there seem to be a few more people from Northern California. What that happenstance, or was that something you sought out?

ND: People are from everywhere. You'll see many French and Canadians (especially people from Novia Scottia). I search. You see the stars have everything. So what we want to do is surprise them with brand new things, new drinks, machines, etc. When you're dealing with people like Charlize Theron or Richard Gere, you want to make sure its worth their time.

AB: No, of course. I think this is an amazing event. Thank you so much for your time. ND: My pleasure.

Sunday, January 19, 2014

Caleb Hannan and Grantland Professionally Handled Dr. V's Story


Caleb Hannan is at the center of a major controversy. 8 months of research lead to an article that was recently published at Grantland. As a Stephen Krol, a man also known as Dr. V committed suicide. As Dr. V, Kroll lived under the name Essay Anne Vanderbuilt and claimed his gender was female. A number of activists felt that Hannan and his editors at Grantland were extremely insensitive in releasing information about Hannan.

Neither Hannan nor his editors were insensitive. When Hannan noticed major discrepancies in Dr. V's claims, he looked further into them. Originally he had wanted to do a story about this amazing new gold putter. But certain things about Dr.V set off red flags. Further research revealed rather unsavory details about her past, her criminal past, and the fact that her ex wives and relatives were all unwilling to speak about her. Most likely what horrified Dr. V the most is that Hannan's investigative journalism revealed things that opened her up for lawsuits and criminal prosecution.

I do understand why some in the transgender or gay community might feel uncomfortable with the prospect of someone digging around in their past. But this isn't a matter of someone exposing a transgender woman to the world. This was a matter of a reporting exposing a con artist, Dr. V, who lied about all aspects of his past. His educational record was fake, his career was fake, his name was fake, and yes, his gender was fake. Hannan would have been unprofessional to write about the criminal past of Dr. V, without revealing Dr. V's birth name of Stephen Krol and Krol's past (Including being married twice, being the father of children, having a brother-in-law who said now the world has one last con man after Krol's suicide, etc.). Perhaps those wishing to hide bad behaviors behind being gay or transgender should not that one cannot hide behind one's sexuality or gender identity.

Saturday, January 18, 2014

LeNair Xavier on the Exploitation in the Porn Business and Gay Club Scene


Today's Interview is with LeNair Xavier. LeNair Xavier is a former porn star/sex worker. He know has taken up the mantle of anti porn activist. Check out LeNair's blog here. Recently he has called out singer Lovari for joining the Latino Fan Club. I decided as there are at least three sides to every story that it could be a good idea to explore the issues LeNair brings up, as they are serious.

Justin Samuels: How do you think the porn industry harms its actors and gays in general?

LeNair Xavier: The porn industry in general preys upon one's desperation for validation. For who else would put themselves through the torture and humiliation that porn actors, especially females and bottoms are put through? So for gays, who isn't more desperate for that validation that a gay male. When gay media makes sexualizing anything possible being the only way to acceptance. Or as a gay person feels ostracized by family and friends due to a homophobic home or religious upbringing. I am definitely the latter, which explains my late coming out, followed by my road to porn 3 years after that.

JS:Could it be that these alleged downlow guys are just acting? How closeted can they be if they are willing to have sex on tape?

LX: Possibly, but that proves to you what's wrong with the industry. If you're doing that much acting, then your greed and narcissism made you forget how porn teaches questioning gay males how to sexually interact. For gay porn picks up in those lessons of sex where their straight parents are naturally void of the information. But more importantly, porn is like every other business. You have to be mindful of what other companies are doing. So with so many other companies using guys who actually define themselves as "gay for pay", you can't be the one studio out of a gazillion where your guys are just acting straight. If a questioning gay male hears all of these "gay for pay" marketing ploys, then finds that video of gay guys acting straight on Pornhub, he doesn't see the difference.

Now how closeted can they be just shows the stupidity of gay-for-pay models regardless of their ethnic background. The White ones do it out of White entitlement thinking they're invincible. So the boomerang of doing this porn is not going to hit them. Meanwhile, the ethnic ones are the ghetto trash who are the opposite end of the spectrum. They're totally dimwitted to the fact that there is a boomerang that exist for doing this. I'm not saying that Black or Latinos who present themselves as educated don't screw on the down low. The majority are just not dumb enough to use money as an excuse to get in front of a camera and do it. Their intellect reminded them that as long as there's a means to play it, what they did in front of that camera is around forever. Ghetto boys don't know that. That's why no matter how big their dick is, they're still boys and not men.

JS: Is there any porn you consider positive?

LX: Any porn that shows 2 people genuinely into each other, who knew of each other, therefore chose each other before getting in front of that camera. That's positive porn. And the only incident I had such a casting was in one of my last (but less known) movies, All Out Assault. For that reason, I am still friends with the man who directed that movie.

JS: You speak out a lot on drug use. Can you talk about how drugs have decimated the gay scene?

LX: That's easy. Whatever your race, gender, orientation, or religion, etc., drugs are a means of escapism. So those in the gay scene using drugs are still trying to escape something. It usually shows itself to be the shame of their homosexuality. For why else would that drug use usually occur with sex play? Sex is a beautiful enough high on its own.

I'm in the gay scene as an observer, but I am not of it like most of the people I know from it. For you can't collect information that I have by standing on the sidelines. You have to get in the middle of it to some degree. That's why some of my views on porn has changed now from what they were before I got in it. Anyway, what I've found is that the gay scene has never been much good for us from past to present. For many in it were and/or are alcoholics and drug abusers. That's why in my Adam4Adam profile, I put in my profile that if you saying "Out No" means you're on the down low, I don't want to talk to you. Because I have chatted with guys on there whose profile says "Out No", and are actually out, they're just not out in the gay scene of bars and clubbing. If their profile says "Out No", then they're one step closer to be man enough for me to want to meet them. Be it for a night, or for life.

JS:You've called the actors at the Latino Fan Club ghetto trash. But perhaps there's another way of looking at this. Where do you think these guys will be in a few years? What's the future of someone's whose ghetto (if the person really is ghetto assume no job skills and a poor education) who gets into this business?

LX: I think you and I define "ghetto" differently. For when I say ghetto trash, I'm talking about the Black and Latino guys who always want to talk the street lingo to be praised for having street cred. They might get an education at Harvard, and have a high paying job, but if you can't present yourself as such when you're away from the job, you are not man enough to be acknowledged as one. For you are presenting the lowest form of our Black and Latino brothers. So whether they're my definition of "ghetto", or yours, the weight of presenting such stupidity is weighing on their shoulders by their time in that business. For it weighs on mine, and I didn't play ghetto, but I was in scene with them. And while I don't regret it since it taught me the lessons I'm passing on now, it does disgust me with myself to think back on it.

JS: Do you think gay culture is collapsing? I ask because many iconic gay bars have closed and a number of aspects of the gay scene just aren't what they used to be. In the 1990s New York, you still had a number of young gay guys desperate to move into Manhattan and become popular by having a sexualized job. Porn star, bartender or waiter in gay bar, or even a drag performer. But it seems as though the scene is dying due to many factors. Gentrification has priced out many gays, and I think younger gays are a lot more mainstream. I've noticed more younger gays with degrees and advanced degrees with actual professional jobs, so the whole allure to even participating in much of the gay scene isn't what it used to be. Also, Adam4Adam and Grindr are proving major competitors to going out looking for hook ups. No need to spend money to get drunk. Your thoughts on all this?

LX: If gay culture is collapsing it's the gay powers-that-be own fault, and no one who has enough pull daring to overthrow them. For gay media puts out there that the only way to get ahead is to prostitute yourself. Look at how many prostituting ads are in nightlife magazines like Next Magazine. How many parties where gay guys end up drunk and/or high make Odyssey and Get Out magazine's advertising money. A newly out gay male feels this is their ticket into these circles to get to their goal. Go-go dancing worked for me to a degree since I've always been a sexual person, and I love to dance. But for some of these guys that's not the case. They get up on the box or bar at a venue, and there's an emptiness in their eyes that shows that being touch by a patron is to them like being molested. And for prostitutes to do their job, they must go to a dead place like a molested child. So it's no wonder gays are known for a skewed view of love.

And before anyone tries calling me a hypocrite again, note how there is a big difference between being a prostitute and an exhibitionist like I was aiming to be in porn. But I admit to my prostituting moments in porn, which is why I know of the ugliness it takes to live such a life. And it began being that was the only way to stay in the business, which is another reason I left. Be the sex I have be done privately or in front of a camera, it must be full of life for a mental connection was formed, and not a financial one.

And gays have always had degrees and advanced degrees. So that's not what's preventing them from going out. What prevents them from going out is that the cost of living is so high that they don't have the time. So Adam4Adam and Grindr are not really competitors. That's media hype. But they are enablers to gays being socially inept, and unable to communicate. For I have often been at a bar full of gorgeous guys, yet you can easily find a guy being a wallflower looking at Grindr.

JS:You obviously say a lot online in many forums about your anti porn activism. Have you decided to take your story and activism to the mainstream media? Perhaps you could pitch your story to publishing companies and write a book. Or maybe you could go on television. Perhaps you should write newspapers too, or even do a documentary on this subject matter.

LX: I would love to go on a tv talk show, and other mainstream media. But they never seem to want a Black voice on the issue. For I tweet, comment, and send emails about blog posts addressing these issues to mainstream media all the time letting them know about my porn past. BUT they always go for the White guy who tip-toes around the deep issues I address. That's why in my poem "Faux Rainbow", some early lines say:

You hear wise words come from the dark skin But you show how it's light you favor For you wait to give him a platform To praise his light skin as the brand of a savior

As for writing a book, I am actually working on an autobiography right now. I'm participating in the Rainbow Book Fair's Poetry Salon for the 4th straight year, and plan to talk to publishers there. But my main goal is to reach more mainstream publishers. Because just because I'm a predominately gay man, my experience overall is not a gay story.

JS: Have you thought about working with community organizations on these issues of exploitation by the porn and sex industry? I would imagine one could hold interesting workshops at places like the LGBT Center, GMHC, QueensPride House, etc.

LX:I have moderated discussions about the porn industry. In fact, I invited some organizations to attend. And talked to the head of a PR company to try to get in contact with these organizations. Well, the organizations didn't attend, and I never heard from the guy from the PR firm with those contacts. And based on the behavior of some guys at my discussion for Men of All Colors Together/NY, "Gay Porn: Sex Educator, Indicator, or Both", I'm sure the reason is because of gay males known arrested development issues. For some showed what I unfortunately expected...When you challenge gay males to think about the porn they're viewing and what they may or may not have learned from it, they act like 5 year-olds when you threaten to take their toys away.

JS: Sometimes people who have gone through what you went through use this passion to propel them back to school and into new careers like social workers, psychologists, lawyers, etc. Have you ever entertained any such ideas?

LX: No, because I'm an artist first and foremost. I'm creative all day long. Any spare moment on my day job I'm jotting something down. So I'm making my art in poetry and writing be my way of being a psychologist, therapist, etc.

JS: What would you tell any young person who wants to play the role of a thug in a gay porn? What would you suggest he do instead?

LX:To any Black or Latino, wanting to play a thug, I might first ask them. To be honest, I know my temper, especially towards such ignorance. So let's hope I would ask them that before telling them how much of a sellout to their own they are being. I would also tell them that if you find that lowering yourself is your only way into a certain circle, then it's not a circle worth being in. For I lowered myself when I worked for Pitbull Productions doing 2 movies, then became a blogger on their ThugPornBlog. I was giving fuel to a bad image of us Blatinos that needs to disappear, and the sooner it's gone, the better. Luckily, I took those lessons, and did better for myself. But not everyone is as blessed as I am to come to that needed realization.

JS: You have your ideas on what's wrong with gay culture. Well, what's right about gay culture, if anything. What should people do to fix it?

LX: The fact hiding it is not as necessary as it once was. But sadly, that's about it. For many gays have taken the lack of needing to hide as much too damn far. Like the slightest sign of someone not coming 100% around to accepting homosexuality just yet, or President doesn't sign a bill into law on their timetable, there a groups running to the media saying "How dare you?!" These are gays who need to realize that acceptance takes time in them just as it probably took time for you yourself. As far as what should be done to fix it, we need to stop the ageism, racism, and sexism within our community. If we start with that many walls within the gay community will come crashing down like they should.

JS: Any thoughts about how recent things such as allowing open gays to serve in the military or allowing gay marriage might benefit gays?

LX:I have a bad history with the military. For a number of people I've met who have been in the military showed themselves to be verbally abusive to me, and others. Including my own grandfather. So to me, gays in the military means more gays getting that drilled into their head, than they got from sexualizing the bullying they've endured. It also means more people dying in war. My feeling is that as gays, we had an out to avoid being another war casualty. Gay activists should have took it. I love this country, but I have higher priorities than this country to live for, like living to love my family.

As for gay marriage, I didn't care much about it until I was a witness at my best friend's wedding. I'm glad to see that gays are afforded the same rights by getting married. But I think after a certain amount of time together, and living together because of it, any couple, straight or gay should be afforded the same rights as a married couple across the land. I do find the fact that it has to go by state to be silly. But then again, that's the hypocrisy of Congress, the Senate, etc.

JS: It seems that much of your criticism of gays is tied to the club scene or porn scene. What about gays who don't operate in this scene or just only occasionally go out? What about gays who live in the suburbs, small towns, and in other locations.

LX: Most of my criticism is tied to gays from the club and porn scene (which are greatly intertwined) because this is what teaches many of us how we are suppose to be if we are gay. Most gays at one point or another operated in the club scene. It may have gotten old for them, but they still did it.

Although many porn producers run to that "it's a fantasy" excuse when someone calls them out, and viewers use it when they don't want that porn taken away because it's on their bucket list, and they want to beat off to it until they can fulfill it, the porn scene is a teacher to many gay males. And that's why I make my criticisms. For it teaching those gays in the suburbs, small towns, and other places across the globe what a certain group of people are like. That's why many small town or suburban White or Europeans come here looking for either the Diesel Washingtons, Bobby Blakes, and Black/Latino thugs to use sex as a tool for abuse. They've sexualized their past abuse as a coping mechanism, and/or their guilt over slavery, corporate theft at the expense of people of color, etc. That's why they're shocked when I treat them the same humanity (or usually way more) than they expect to be treated by a White suitor.

JS: Some gay men say these psychoses are from oppression from the mainstream society. Do you see these pressures improving in recent years (look at the legal advances)? Have you yourself noticed any positive effects or changes?

LX: This is a case where I'm hoping for the best, but expecting the worst. For not looking my age (43 come March) has made me able to infiltrate the younger generation of gays. And sadly, I see this generation of 20-something gays having a sense of entitlement when they've done nothing to deserve it. That's an attitude that will definitely halt their emotional and mental growth. Thereby making them easy targets for the older gays (and society in general) who are more savvy on how to manipulate their naivete. So I'm hoping some young gay will do like I do, and give them a wake up call. Their popularity won't start out full of smiling faces, but they will be respected. And gays will hopefully want to follow that person to earn that respect themselves. --

My New Author's Page on Amazon


I didn't realize until recently that Amazon even had an author's page. Amazon made it easier for book readers to find authors on Amazon by grouping all the books and readers comments they have together as a single page. This way of someone is fan of writer they can keep updated on all the books they've written. My own Amazon page can be found here. I also have three documentaries available on Amazon. The first is the Many Faces of Occupy Wall Street. That video covers the spectrum of people from Occupy Wall Street as it was happening in 2011, from a variety of activists. The second is Rockaway Gentrification, which chronicles the history and the current gentrification of Queens, NY's Rockaway peninsula. The third is Coney Island Restoration, which is about how the city of New York brought Coney Island back from being nearly demolished.

The History of My Insanity and the Stripper Diaries, Trishas Paytas's New Books


Trisha Paytas has written two new books. One, the History of My Insanity, chronicles the damage the sex life has done to her mentally. It's an issue she's talk about in her videos on YouTube. The second is the Stripper Diaries, which are also more or less autobiographical.

Overall the common consensus seems to be that though the books have good story telling potential, that there were some technical errors (spelling, grammar) as well as plot eras which took a lot away from the books. Trisha self published her books on Amazon. Nothing's wrong with self publishing, one just needs to make sure one's books are edited before publishing on Amazon. Let's hope she reads the comments and incorporates the advice from the constructive elements into her work.

Trisha is a marketing genius. She did use her YouTube superstardom and decided to use it to make money in other ways. YouTube pays money per views, and for awhile that was probably one of her main sources of income. But she realized you can easily use that fame to make money for yourself in other ways. If her book sales become big enough, she might get a publishing deal or a film deal. Trisha is an excellent example of how to promote yourself as an entertainer in the digital age. For more of Trisha's perspective, you can check out my interview of her.